ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2016  |  Volume : 15  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 31-37

Detection of bactericidal activity of camel's milk compared with raw and processed cow's milk against pathogenic bacteria


Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Applied Medical Science, October 6th University, 6th of October City, Egypt

Correspondence Address:
Amal S Othman
Central Axis, Part 1/1, 12588 Elsheikh Zayed, 6th of October City
Egypt
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/1687-4315.184031

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Objective The aim of this study was to determine the antimicrobial activity of camel's milk compared with three types of raw and processed cow's milk as a natural safe way to overcome pathogenic bacteria instead of using chemotherapy, which leads to the phenomenon of microbial resistance. Materials and methods A total of 16 milk samples were collected; four samples from four healthy camels (4 years old), four fresh cow milk samples, four pasteurized milk samples, and four packed buttermilk samples. The camel's and cow's milk were boiled before the investigation. Bacterial isolation from these samples was carried out on specific media. The antibacterial activity for each milk type was assessed against seven Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial strains previously examined for its multidrug resistance activity. The minimal inhibitory concentration and minimal bactericidal concentration of each milk type was also determined. Transmission electron microscope was used for the highly affected bacterial strain for each of the milk types. Results and conclusion The four milk sample types were free from bacterial contamination. They all possessed antimicrobial activity but not for all seven examined bacterial strains. The strains affected were Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae by camel's milk and E. coli and Streptococcus faecalis by the other three cow's milk types. Pasteurized milk and buttermilk showed the higher effects. Minimal inhibitory concentration and minimal bactericidal concentration for the milk types ranged between 10 and 80%. Transmission electron microscope studies on the bacteria affected revealed damage in bacterial cell wall and disturbance in cell protein content. It can be concluded that milk can be used in vitro as a natural safe way to overcome some pathogenic bacteria instead of using antibiotics.


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